Parliamentary Network E-News

Volume 14
No. 7
October, 2020
 
Focus on the U.S.

The US Presidential Election: Lives of Unborn Children at Risk


The lives of millions of unborn children in the US and around the world depend on the outcome of the US presidential election. President Trump and his policies are the most pro-life of any US administration and seek to protect the lives of children in the womb while assisting their mothers and denying funding to the abortion industry. Democratic nominee Joe Biden and the pro-abortion policies he supports will result in death for millions of children in the womb, at U.S. taxpayer expense, and increased funding to organizations that perform and promote abortion in the US and globally.
 
This election reveals stark differences on abortion, not just between the candidates but between the two main political parties. Long gone is the time when the Democratic party’s platform called for abortion to be “safe, legal and rare”. Now, supporters seek easy access to abortion-inducing drugs so women can “self-manage” their abortions at home.
 
President Trump has time and again reaffirmed his pro-life stand informing Congress that he “will veto any legislation that weakens current pro-life Federal policies and laws, or that encourages the destruction of innocent human life at any stage.” His pro-life accomplishments and policies can be read here
 
Whereas Joe Biden, in response to a question expressing concern that the US Supreme Court might overturn the Roe v Wade decision that forced abortion on demand throughout pregnancy on the US said, “The only responsible response to that would be to pass legislation making Roe the law of the land. That’s what I would do.”
 
Currently, according to the Roe decision, the 50 US states each has the right to make its own laws and regulations on abortion. Biden’s attempt to codify Roe into law would eliminate common-sense state laws which Joe Biden’s website acknowledges. It states, As president, Biden will work to codify Roe v. Wade, and his Justice Department will do everything in its power to stop the rash of state laws that so blatantly violate the constitutional right to an abortion, such as so-called TRAP laws, parental notification requirements, mandatory waiting periods, and ultrasound requirements.”
 
A number of Catholic clergy have been vocal in their opposition to Joe Biden for his support of abortion including:
 
 
PNCI recommends watching a homily by a Catholic parish priest, a convert, which has received over 2 million views to fully appreciate the gravity of the US presidential election. Staring Into the Abyss with Fr. Ed Meeks is worth taking 26 minutes to watch. A shortened 3-minute version Joe Biden: He is “Unabashedly Pro-Abortion can be found here.

Justice Amy Coney Barrett


The U.S. Senate voted 52-48 to confirm Amy Coney Barrett as an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, President Trump’s third appointment to the US Supreme Court. Justice Barrett, an accomplished judge and mother of seven, who received her law degree from and taught at Notre Dame Law School, faced hostile opposition from Democrat senators who openly questioned her position on issues arising from concern over her Catholic faith. They even objected that she had once signed a newspaper ad stating that human life begins at conception. Justice Barrett easily handled the negativity while refusing to predict how she might decide on future cases. Justice Barrett was signed into the court by Chief Justice John Roberts replacing deceased Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg.
 
During his opening statement, Senator Lindsay Graham, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, praised Barrett’s views stating, “This is the first time in American history that we’ve nominated a woman who is unashamedly pro-life and embraces her faith without apology, and she is going to the court.” He continued, “This hearing to me is an opportunity to not punch through a glass ceiling, but a reinforced concrete barrier around conservative women.” 
Defending Life

Geneva Consensus Declaration: Promote Women's Health, Life and Family


The governments of the US, Brazil, Egypt, Hungary, Indonesia, and Uganda cosponsored a virtual gathering for a ceremonial signing of the Geneva Consensus Declaration, “a historic document that further strengthens an ongoing coalition to achieve better health for women, the preservation of human life, support for the family as foundational to a healthy society, and the protection of national sovereignty in global politics”.
 
The Declaration was named for the anticipated meeting of the World Health Assembly in Geneva, before it was postponed due to the pandemic, and was viewed as the most fitting venue for the growing coalition which believes “that finding genuine solutions to health concerns should be a priority uniting Member States. This Declaration charts a positive way forward for accelerating progress on achieving this end.”
 
The Declaration has four pillars: (1) better health for women, (2) the preservation of human life, (3) strengthening of family as the foundational unit of society, and (4) protecting every nation's national sovereignty in global politics.
 
In regards to abortion, the Declaration emphasizes that “in no case should abortion be promoted as a method of family planning” and that “any measures or changes related to abortion within the health system can only be determined at the national or local level according to the national legislative process”. It reaffirms that “the child… needs special safeguards and care… before as well as after birth” and “special measures of protection and assistance should be taken on behalf of all children,” based on the principle of the best interest of the child.
 
The 33 countries which have signed the Declaration so far represent over 1.6 billion people from every region of the world. The full list of countries, the Declaration and a related video can all be viewed on the Declaration’s web page.
 
The Manila Times wrote an editorial questioning why the Philippines has not signed the Declaration: Why did PH not join in rejecting international right to abortion? The Declaration remains open for the Philippines or any other country to sign. PNCI encourages parliamentarians to read and share the Declaration with their governments.
 
Contact jointstatement@hhs.gov for more information.

Poland: Constitutional Tribunal Rules to Protect Unborn with Disabilities


Poland’s Constitutional Tribunal struck down the exception to the 1993 law that allowed abortion in the case of disability, ruling that it violates the constitution and discriminates against human beings with disabilities. Abortion is still allowed in cases of threat to the mother’s life and in cases of rape and incest. It is estimated that 1,000 abortions a year take place for disability of the unborn child.
 
Parliamentarians from the ruling Law and Justice party filed a legal challenge against the 1993 law permitting abortion in cases of severe fetal disabilities. The decision was rendered on October 22, the feast of St. Pope John Paul II from Poland known for his strong opposition to abortion and support for a culture of life, and cannot be appealed.
 
According to ECLJ, “In reaching its decision, the Court stated that human life is protected at all stages of its development, as soon as conception; and that it is more valuable than health. Therefore, life cannot be sacrificed for health. The Court relied on international law, in particular the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, which recognizes that "the child, by reason of his physical and intellectual immaturity, needs special protection and care, including appropriate legal protection, before as well as after birth", and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability.”
 
Archbishop Stanisław Gądecki hailed the verdict saying, “By its decision, the constitutional court affirmed that the idea that ‘life is not worth living’ is in flagrant contradiction with the principle of a democratic state governed by law.” 
 
“The life of every human being, from conception to natural death, has the same value before God and must be protected to the same degree by the state.” 
 
Poland’s Ombudsman for Children, Mikołaj Pawlak, praised the ruling, “The decision of the Constitutional Tribunal declaring eugenic abortion inconsistent with the fundamental law is the victory of life over death. It is the restoration of equality of rights for every human being, including the unborn.”
 
Pro-abortion activists took to the streets in opposition to the ruling staging rallies, often violent protests targeting churches, and a Women’s Strike. They are also targeting the Law and Justice Party and Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki who warned that abortion activists are risking lives by protesting in crowds during the pandemic. Morawiecki also defended the right to life as the most fundamental of all rights saying, “The freedom of choice truly is a fundamental thing but we should all agree that in order to have this freedom of choice, one needs to be alive. The one who is dead cannot implement one’s right of freedom of choice.”
 
The Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights, Dunja Dunja Mijatović criticized the ruling describing it on Twitter as “a sad day for women’s rights.” A group of abortion activists serving in UN positions as “independent human rights experts” issued a statement Poland has slammed door shut on legal and safe abortions.
 
They declared, “Poland has decided to sacrifice women’s human right to safe and legal health services for termination of pregnancy on account of protection of the right to life of the unborn in violation of its international human rights obligations.”
 
They falsely claim that the right to life begins at birth, “It cannot be justified by invoking the protection of the right to life, as the right to life and all other human rights under international human rights law are accorded to those who have been born. Those who believe that personhood commences at the time of conception have the freedom to act in accordance with their beliefs but not to impose their beliefs on others through the legal system".
 
The UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD Committee) has not issued any statement regarding the Court’s decision which is in line with the treaty. However, when the Human Rights Committee was writing its General Comment on the right to life the CRPD Committee objected to language allowing abortion “most notably where the pregnancy is the result of rape or incest or when the foetus suffers from fatal impairment”. It stated then, “The CRPD Committee proposes to delete these examples. Laws which explicitly allow for abortion on grounds of impairment violate the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (Art,. 4,5,8). Even if the condition is considered fatal, there is still a decision made on the basis of impairment. Often it cannot be said if an impairment is fatal. Experience shows that assessments on impairment conditions are often false. Even if it is not false, the assessment perpetuates notions of stereotyping disability as incompatible with a good life.” 
 
Protests extended to the floor of parliament where opposition lawmakers disrupted legislative business with loud chanting and placards with the slogans as 'This is war' and 'Legalize abortion' while standing in front of MPs from the Law and Justice party, including its leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski. Security officers had to come to the chamber and push through other opposition lawmakers who linked arms and tried to stop security officers from intervening in the protest.

UK: MP Issues Pro-Life Warning


Abortion was legalized in the UK 53 years ago under the context that it was to be used in “exceptional circumstances” but has led to a “staggering 9,563,907 babies losing lives” writes Lord David Alton, House of Lords, in Beware the Laws of Unintended Consequences – and champion the supreme human right: the right to life.
 
Lord Alton warns, “As the campaign intensifies to legalise euthanasia in the UK it is worth recalling that a law – 53 years old today – which was only going to be used in exceptional, limited and compassionate circumstances has led to a staggering 9,563,907 babies in the womb having their lives ended in Britain. That’s one new life is ended every 3 minutes – some, right up to birth.”
 
His message is timely and needs to be heeded as the world faces the challenges presented by COVID-19: “Legislators should be wary of laws of unintended consequences. What is done in the name of choice, rights, and even compassion, can have shocking consequences on a vast scale – and we must always search for alternatives based on defending life, not destroying it. The right to life is the supreme human right – and, without it, all the other rights are worthless.”
International Pressure for Abortion

Mexico: Violent Pro-Abortion Protests


Pro-abortion activists in Mexico staged a violent protest on so-called International Safe Abortion Day held on September 28, 2020 with the theme Self-Managed Abortion and a call for countries “to set aside laws and policies that are restricting access to safe abortion, and allow telemedicine and self-managed abortion in line with World Health Organization guidance.”
 
Protestors in Mexico, wearing green bandanas symbolizing the pro-abortion movement in Latin America, demanded the legalization of abortion. Mexico bans abortion except for cases of the mother’s life, rape, and fetal disability while Mexico City and the southern state of Oaxaca allow abortion on demand for the first twelve weeks of pregnancy.
 
Abortion extremists were reported to have “charged police lines and threw Molotov cocktails at officers in Mexico City on Monday during protests demanding the legalization of abortion in the majority Roman Catholic country”.
 
Reports of the violence included, Police, many of them female officers, responded by spraying plumes of tear gas at the women, some of whom wielded hammers, and threw bottles and paint.”

Argentina: Pro-Abortion Activists Attack Church and Town Hall


Pro-abortion activists ended a women’s conference in the Patagonia region with a march calling for legalized abortion and separation of church and state that led to firebombing the town hall and spray painting a Catholic church.
 
Catholic News Agency reports that women threw Molotov cocktail firebombs at the Trelew town hall and attacked other public buildings with bombs, stones, and graffiti, including Mary Help of Christians parish.
 
The report includes that police “eventually managed to control the mob and ten women were arrested” and had to “shut down two gas stations for selling gasoline to young women who were suspected to be collecting gasoline for the Molotov cocktails.”
The incident according to the news, “is one of numerous attacks on Catholic churches since the Argentinian senate rejected a bill legalizing abortion in August of this year.”

Kenya: Marie Stopes Clinic Shut Down for Illegal Abortions


Police in Nairobi arrested five workers at the Marie Stopes Prestige Health Point Medical Centre over allegations of “aiding abortion, after 10 decomposing foetuses were found in the clinic”. Two of those arrested are alleged to be doctors but the Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Council disowned the two “doctors” and ordered the closure of the clinic.
 
“The council wishes to clarify that the two mentioned individuals are not duly registered medical practitioners as provided under the Medical Practitioners and Dentists Act,” said the Council’s CEO Daniel Yumbya. “The council has ordered the closure of the facility and suspended its registration certificate (KMPDC 001247) and its operating licence to pave the way for investigations.”
 
The police also found a woman described as “appearing weak” who was admitted to the hospital. The police report also included finding “assorted medical appliances, medical records, assorted drugs suspected to be used in conducting the abortions”. The bodies of the ten aborted babies were found in a blue bin and were taken to the “City Mortuary for preservation as investigations continue”.
 
Abortion is not legal in Kenya except for the mother’s life. This is not the first time Marie Stopes has violated a country’s laws on abortion and been forced to close a clinic.

Time: Provider of Abortion Pills Among Top 100 Influential People


TIME magazine has revealed its pro-abortion bias by selecting Rebecca Gomperts, founder of Women on Waves and Women on Web, as one of its 100 most influential people of 2020. Gomperts enables illegal abortion by providing abortion-inducing drugs to women in countries which ban abortion or ban the abortion drugs. Gomperts is listed in the category of “Pioneers” and was praised for her work in a tribute by Cecile Richards, former president of Planned Parenthood.
 
Richards applauds Gomperts, “She’s spent her career expanding abortion access around the world, using everything from sea voyages to drones to the Internet to reach the people who count on her—­especially those in rural, restricted and dangerous areas. In 2019, Gomperts sued the FDA for the ability to continue providing early, safe abortion remotely in the form of pills through her organization, Aid Access, after the agency allegedly attempted to block her distribution. Now, with barriers to abortion—cost, risk of COVID-19, childcare and politics, to name a few—more daunting than ever, Gomperts’ work is especially urgent….In this moment of fear and uncertainty, Gomperts is a beacon of hope, standing up for the principle that safe abortion is a human right.”
Focus on the United Nations

U.S. Leads Joint Statement on UDHR


The 75th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was the occasion for a Joint Statement on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights signed by 57 countries, under the leadership of the United States. The statement has profound implications for issues and debates at the United Nations where reinterpretations of human rights to advance controversial policies is pervasive, especially in regard to abortion. It states:
 
We, the above listed signatories of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, established and adopted in 1948, recommit ourselves today to the Declaration and its foundational ideal that certain principles are so fundamental as to apply to all human beings, everywhere, at all times. We recognize the many differences in our cultural, political, legal, religious, and other traditions, yet reaffirm fundamental freedoms and rights for all, and reassert our commitment to honoring the dignity of all persons that is the basis for our commitments under the UDHR.
 
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a video message that “we must defend unalienable rights today, because the International Human Rights Project is in crisis.”
 
He added that many multinational organizations have lost their way, focusing on partisan policy preferences while failing to defend fundamental rights.
 
Secretary Pompeo statement included, “The first line of the UDHR reads, ‘Recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice, and peace in the world’.
 
“To uphold universal human rights, we should look to the framers of the UDHR, who identified a clear set of principles that apply to all people, everywhere, at all times. They stood unwaveringly in defense of the dignity of every human being.
“So, too, should we.”

Holy See Objects to Promotion of Abortion


The Holy See has been vocal in its opposition to the promotion of abortion at the United Nations. Pope Francis in his video address to the UN General Assembly said, “Sad to say, some countries and international institutions are also promoting abortion as one of the so-called ‘essential services’ provided in the humanitarian response to the pandemic.  It is troubling to see how simple and convenient it has become for some to deny the existence of a human life as a solution to problems that can and must be solved for both the mother and her unborn child.”
 
In a statement delivered by Archbishop Gabriele Giordano Caccia, Apostolic Nuncio and Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations, on the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Holy See expressed its concern over pressure at the United Nations to reinterpret “the very foundations of human rights and to compromise their inner unity so as to move away from the protection of human dignity and to satisfy political and economic interests.” The Holy See objected to what it views as an approach that “creates a hierarchy of human rights by relativizing human dignity and assigning more value and additional rights to the strong and healthy, while discarding the weak”.
 
The Holy See also expressed its deeply concern that “some countries and international institutions are promoting abortion as one of the so-called ‘essential services’ provided in the humanitarian response to the pandemic. It is troubling to see how simple and convenient it has become for some to deny the existence of a human life as a solution to problems that can and must be solved for both the mother and her unborn child.”
 
The Holy See, as did the US, also objected to inclusion of the term “reproductive rights” in the UN resolution— Comprehensive And Coordinated Response To The Covid-19 Pandemic—issuing a reservation.
 
Archbishop Caccia said, “Finally, the Holy See considers it most unfortunate that the adopted resolution includes the deeply concerning and divisive reference to ‘sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights’ (OP7)…In particular, the Holy See rejects the interpretation that considers abortion or access to abortion, sex-selective abortion, abortion of fetuses diagnosed with health challenges, maternal surrogacy, and sterilization as dimensions of ‘reproductive health,’ or as part of universal health coverage.”

Read more here.
Focus on the Organization of American States

Countries Issue Joint Statement on Life and Family


The recent 50th General Assembly meeting of the Organization of American States (OAS) witnessed the joint statement “Strengthening the Family and the Rights of Women of All Ages” presented by the delegations of Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Paraguay, the United States of America, St. Lucia, and Venezuela.
 
The statement explains that the countries, “REAFFIRM that ‘every human being has the right to life, liberty and the security of his person;’ and that ‘all persons are equal before the law”.
 
The countries pledged their commitment to work together during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond to: 1 To ensure the full enjoyment of optimal health, human rights, and equal opportunity for women at all levels of political, economic, and public life. 2. To protect the family as foundational to society and as a source of health, support, and care throughout the Americas. 3. To defend the sovereign right of nations to make their own laws related to the protection of life from the moment of conception. 4. To work in solidarity until these goals are fully accomplished.
Legislative News

Slovakia: Parliament Rejects Pro-Life Bill by One Vote


The Slovak parliament failed to pass a pro-life bill by a narrow vote of 59-58. The legislation proposed by conservative MPs would have increased waiting periods before getting an abortion to 96 hours, require a reason for procuring an abortion, and prohibited clinics from advertising abortion services. Supporters said the bill would allow women to make more informed decisions and provided financial support for early pregnancy. Bill sponsor OLANO-Christian Union deputy Anna Zaborska said they would try again in six months. “Our proposal to help pregnant women did not go through. I regret that my colleagues did not, in this difficult economic situation, support those most vulnerable - pregnant women and children,” said Zaborska.
 

Malawi: Parliament Adjourns Leaving Abortion Bill Behind


Malawi’s parliament has adjourned for recess without picking up a controversial bill to expand abortion access. The Termination of Pregnancy Bill would permit abortion in cases where it is deemed medically necessary, including for the life and health of mother and in cases of rape and incest. Abortion proponents pushed strongly for the bill, claiming it was needed to address the country’s high rates of maternal mortality. Religious groups such as the Episcopal Conference of Malawi, the Malawi Council of Churches, and the Muslim Association of Malawi, among others, pushed back against the bill.  

South Korea: Government Will Act to Legalize Abortion


The South Korean Justice Ministry has announced plans to legalize abortion, implementing a 2019 court decision that deemed the country’s law banning abortion unconstitutional. The proposed plan would permit abortion on demand up to 14 weeks gestation, and up to 24 weeks in cases of rape, risks to the mother’s health, and fetal disability. It also permits the use of abortion drugs. Abortion activists claim the proposal doesn’t go far enough, urging the government to lift the ban all together.

France: National Assembly Expands Abortion


France’s National Assembly has approved a bill to expand abortion and remove conscience protections for medical personnel. Under the new legislation, abortion would be available on demand with no restrictions up to 14 weeks gestation, midwives would be permitted to perform surgical abortions up to 10 weeks gestation, and health providers who conscientiously object to performing abortions would be required to provide referrals to those who will. The approved bill has been referred to France’s National Ethics Advisory Committee, after which it will go to the Senate.
 
The National Assembly also passed a bioethics law that would legalize medical assisted procreation (PMS), permit the genetic engineering of human embryos, and allow the creation of chimeras and “medicine babies” to be conceived in test tubes and selected for implantation depending on their genetic make-up and use for a future transplant. It was reported that the law was adopted with only a few members present and an additional provision was added to permit abortions up to nine months of pregnancy in cases of the mother’s “psychosocial distress”. 

 


Ireland: Parliament Votes for Euthanasia


Irish TDs approved a bill to legalize euthanasia, despite it being opposed by healthcare providers. The bill was passed in the Oireachtas by a vote of 81 to 71, following a limited debate lasting 70 minutes, with only four minutes allotted to TDs opposing the bill. The Irish Palliative Medicine Consultants’ Association, the Royal College of Physicians in Ireland, and the Association for Palliative Medicine of Britain and Ireland opposed the bill, as well as the Catholic bishops.  
Executive News

Argentina: President Announces Plan for Abortion Law


Argentina’s President Alberto Fernandez has announced plans to legalize abortion, saying a draft bill was nearly ready for Congress. President Fernandez said he was following through on a campaign “commitment” after his plans to introduce legislation in March were put on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Argentina’s current law which permits abortion in cases of the life or health of the mother and in cases of rape was challenged in 2018 when the Chamber of Deputies passed legislation for legalization which was ultimately defeated in the Senate. The Catholic bishops criticized the move calling the timing of it “untenable and inappropriate.” A pro-life group posted similar criticisms on social media. “Seriously, is abortion a priority in the middle of a crisis?” said Prolife Unity. “Argentines need a State that takes care of them, that lifts them out of poverty and doesn’t abandon them. Abortion was not and is not a priority.” 

Ecuador: President Vetoes Abortion Health Code Bill


Ecuador’s President Lenin Moreno vetoed the Health Code Bill that would have brought abortion into the country. The National Assembly had passed the bill which would have expanded the country’s current abortion law which only permits abortion in cases of rape or when the mother’s life is at risk. The right to life is enshrined in Ecuador’s constitution which states “girls, boys and adolescents shall enjoy the rights common to human beings, in addition to those specific to their age. The state shall recognize and guarantee life including its care and protection from conception.” Pro-life leaders celebrated the president’s veto. "From the very beginning we said that this code was a code of death and today we say with joy that life has triumphed," said Archbishop Alfredo José Espinoza Mateus of Quito. 

Netherlands: Health Minister Wants to Permit Euthanasia for Children


Dutch Health Minister Hugo de Jonge is drafting legislation to permit euthanasia for children. The proposed law would permit doctors to help children 12 and younger to end their lives without prosecution. Children older than 12 are already able to request assisted suicide with parental consent. In a letter to parliament, de Jonge cited a study that “shows that there is a need for active termination of life among doctors and patients of incurably ill children, who are suffering hopelessly and unbearably and will die within the foreseeable future.” Dutch cardinal Willem Eijk commented on the slow erosion of safeguards since legalizing euthanasia. “Once accepting the termination of life for a certain measure of suffering, one will always be confronted with the question of whether it should not also be allowed in suffering that is only a little bit less,” said Eijk.  
Judicial News

South Africa: Charges Dropped Against Pro-Life Doctor


Charges against a pro-life South African doctor for calling a patient’s unborn child “a human being” have been dropped after two years of legal proceedings. Dr. Jacques de Vos was charged with unprofessional conduct for telling a 19-year-old patient that life begins at conception, that her “fetus was a human being”, and that abortion kills an unborn person. Dr. de Vos was unable to practice medicine for the last two years, an injustice his lawyer Martus de Wet highlighted. “The withdrawal of the charges after a year cannot reverse the impact of the procedural unfairness to the career of the young doctor,” said de Wet. “This case also signifies the danger we face when disciplinary procedures are used to silence or intimidate health professionals who are open about their beliefs in the sanctity of life.” De Vos now hopes to receive a full acquittal based on the evidence his team had already presented demonstrating the doctor was merely sharing facts with his patient.

 
 
Parliamentary Network for Critical Issues
Advancing global respect and dignity for life through law and policy.

In this Issue

 

Focus on the U.S.

The U.S. Presidential Election: Lives of Unborn Children at Risk

Justice Amy Coney Barrett

 

Defending Life

Geneva Consensus Declaration: Promote Women's Health, Life and Family

Poland: Constitutional Tribunal Rules to Protect Unborn with Disabilities

UK: MP Issues Pro-Life Warning

 

International Pressure for Abortion

Mexico: Violent Pro-Abortion Protests

Argentina: Pro-Abortion Activists Attack Church and Town Hall

Kenya: Marie Stopes Clinic Shut Down for Illegal Abortions

Time: Provider of Abortion Pills Among Top 100 Influential People

 

Focus on the United Nations

U.S. Leads Joint Statement on UDHR

Holy See Objects to Promotion of Abortion

 

Focus on the Organization of American States

Countries Issue Joint Statement on Life and Family

 

Legislative News

Slovakia: Parliament Rejects Pro-Life Bill by One Vote

Malawi: Parliament Adjourns Leaving Pro-Abortion Bill Behind

South Korea: Government Will Act to Legalize Abortion

France: National Assembly Expands Abortion

Ireland: Parliament Votes for Euthanasia

 

Executive News

Argentina: President Announces Plan for Abortion Law

Ecuador: President Vetoes Abortion Health Code Bill

Netherlands: Health Minister Wants to Permit Euthanasia for Children

 

Judicial News

South Africa: Charges Dropped Against Pro-Life Doctor